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      =TS=LJohnson13

      Political Donations Via Corporations

      Question

      http://globalnews.ca/news/2070461/alberta-passes-bill-banning-corporate-and-union-donations/

       

      Alberta recently passed a bill stating that the act of donating funds to political figures would be from this point forward banned.

       

      If this was introduced in America, or even a global scale. What impact would it have for individuals running for office? Or better yet, how would it affect our governement as a whole over the course of a decade?

      =TS=Eddie likes this

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      On the one hand I think it'd prevent corporations from controlling/running/owning government offices. On the other it'd give wealthy candidates a huge campaigning advantage. I'd enjoy seeing how various regions reacted to different candidates and what 'light' candidates from different wealth brackets would be cast in.

       

      ~ Eddie

      =TS=LJohnson13 likes this

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      It gives a lot more power back to the people when this happens, and the wealthy candidates don't have that much more of an advantage here.  The party that is in power, and passed this bill (law) is the NDP.  Most of the people we voted in for the NDP this last election tend to be average citizens, not necessarily the wealthier ones.  The lady representing my area is an average mother, lives in a small, older home with her family, and drives an average car (I can't remember the model, but I believe it was from the early to mid 2000's).

       

      We just have a provincial election on May 5 of this year, in which we voted in the NDP.  Previously, the party that was in power was the PCs, who tend to be more pro-business, and are usually wealthier business owners themselves.  Prior to May 5, the PCs had 70 seats and the NDP only had 4.  However, the PCs have said and done a few things in the past few years that have annoyed the common citizens of the province, and took a beating in the last election.  They only got 10 seats, and the NDP got 54 (we have 3 other parties as well), so as you can see, having money doesn't make it easier to win the election.

       

      I think part of the difference (coming from someone who only observes the US political system, so take this with a grain of salt...) is that we have parties that are actually fighting for peoples votes.  It isn't as simple as just throwing a bunch of money at marketing in the year coming up to the election, and hoping for the best.  Also, the parties are different from each other, so we have choice.  This keeps our government more accountable to the people.

      Another difference is that we vote once, instead of having those primaries and all that other stuff where the candidates basically just game the system to get themselves elected by manipulating the voting regions.  There is a bit of that happening here, but it is harder to pull off.

       

      Something else to consider is that we also have limits on the amount that an individual person can donate per year to their political party, so the rich can't just effectively buy their votes that way.

      =TS=LJohnson13 likes this

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      I'm just not sure how it would play out in general though. As the saying goes, you boil a frog in a pot of water, it wont realized how screwed it is until its too late. We are at the point where we are feeling the heat from this figurative pot of water and I'm not sure if swapping out the system to prevent "buying votes" would be exactly the most beneficial option in this current time. On the other hand , continuing this would in turn possibly ruin a portion of elections and possibly pose a threat to corrupted offices and under the table deals. But Im young and lack experience in this field due to my path of education and lack of research.

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      God help you, Alberta, in your political "experiment".  I salute your efforts.

       

      And yet Alberta uses the Canadian dollar, which is printed by the Bank of Canada, or BoC (much like the Fed in the USA)... So it won't matter who's in office, as long as Alberta is enslaved by a central bank..

       

      “The bank hath benefit of interest on all moneys which it creates out of nothing.” 
      William Paterson, founder of the Bank of England in 1694, then a privately owned bank.
       
      “Let me issue and control a nation’s money and I care not who writes the laws.” 
      Mayer Amschel Rothschild (1744-1812), founder of the House of Rothschild.
       
      “The few who understand the (banking) system will either be so interested in its profits or be so dependent upon its favours that there will be no opposition from that class, while on the other hand, the great body of people, mentally incapable of comprehending the tremendous advantage that capital derives from the system, will bear its burdens without complaint, and perhaps without even suspecting that the system is inimical to their interests.” 
      The Rothschild brothers of London writing to associates in New York, 1863.
      =TS=LJohnson13 likes this

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